Classroom Management & Organization, Teaching in Quarantine

The Beauty of the Grade Change Form

Ms. Brown, I redid that assignment, will you change my grade?

Ms. Brown, I still have a zero in Powerschool for the quiz I made up last week.

Ms. Brown, I finally submitted the assignment that was due two weeks ago, can you grade it please?

Late work, make up work, re-done work: I may get a notification in Schoology, but that doesn’t mean I will remember to update it in PowerSchool. And I certainly can’t stop in the middle of class to update a grade, nor can I be counted on to remember by the time my planning period rolls around.

Would you please fill out the grade change form?”

The grade change form puts the responsibility on the student to notify me of the issue, and sends me an email I can deal with on my planning period. It lives at the top of my Schoology page, so it is easily accessible to students. Between distance learners, classroom learners, and quarantined learners, I have a lot to keep up with, but the grade change form gives me an easy way to keep up with make up work, and makes one less thing to keep track of in my overworked brain.

Gracias to Elsie Ratcliff for sharing this idea in her fabulous webinar with Jamie Vega. You can find the link to their presentation “Tips for Easy Unit Planning during Digital Learning​” on the Georgia World Languages Professional Development page.

Teaching in Quarantine

Lesson Ideas: Nugget + Question

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I am on week three of digital learning/lesson planning. This week, my students will be working on some nuggets from Señor Wooly. I have assigned one nugget a day, paired with a question. The question gives me a chance to interact with them, gauge their reaction to the song, and also highlight some of the linguistic structures in the lyrics. Here’s what that looks like:

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If you can’t see the images, here are the questions:


Spanish 1- Qué asco

  1. “Qué asco” means how gross.  What is the grossest food you see in the video? Upload your answer to the submission box.
  2. Do you like any foods that other people think are gross? Upload your answer to the submission box! Personally, I really like kale, when it is prepared right! ¡Qué delicioso!
  3. What normal/common foods make you say “¡Qué asco!”? Upload your answer to the submission box! Personally, I hate peas – ¡No me gustan nada los guisantes!

On Friday, they have a discussion post:
The man and woman in ¡Qué asco!  like a lot of gross foods. Change one of the lines of the song so that the food isn’t gross – change 1-2 words so that when you say “Me gusta”, it’s true!

asco 4


In Spanish 2, they will be watching La confesión de Victor. Here are the questions I’ve given them:

  1. In the song, Victor tells us, Yo era guapo pero ya no lo soy. – I was (used to be) handsome, but now I’m not. How have you changed since elementary, middle, or preschool? Rewrite the lyric, changing guapo to an adjective that describes how you used to be. Upload the new lyric (Yo era _______ pero ya no lo soy) to the submission box.
  2. Victor tells us many things he can’t do without hair – sin pelo. What if we changed the line to sin escuela (without school?) Or, con corona? (with corona?) What would you say you can’t do? Upload your response to the submission box.Sin escuela, ya no puedo _________. (Without I school, I can’t ______ anymore).

    Con corona, ya no puedo _________. (With corona, I can’t ______ anymore.)

     

  3. La confesión de Víctor is just the second song in the Victor trilogy – the third video is called Feo. Go watch Feo on SenorWooly.com. Between Guapo, La confesión de Víctor, and Feo, which video is your favorite? Why? Upload your answer to the submission box.

One of the most challenging parts of quarantine teaching, is, for me, not interacting with my students. Students have always inspired and motivated my teaching, and it’s really hard to teach without seeing and talking to them every day! By adding a question to the nugget assignment, I get to see their response to the material, comment back on it, and get a bit of that student-teacher interaction we have been missing out on.